Landscape VS. Urbanism

Overgrown and in between.

lambtime:

Ernst Cramer (1898 - 1980)
Garten des Poeten (Poet’s Garden)

The Poet’s Garden is likely the most important garden in all of Cramer’s professional career. 
He worked with minimal means and maximum abstraction instead of imitating nature and as a result, kicked off a new art form called Land Art, creating impressive, almost archaic geometrical earth sculptures, which are among the most important sources of inspiration for present-day landscape architects.

Kassler described the design: ”Triangular earth mounds and a stepped cone were precisely edged, grass-sheathed, and doubled by a still pool. The garden was not so much a garden as a sculpture to walk through, abstract earth shapes independent of place, with sharp arises foreign to the nature of their material.”

(via landscape-a-design)

invisiblestories:

"The recruits of 1914 have the look of ghosts. They are queuing up to be slaughtered: they are already dead." - Geoff Dyer, The Missing of the Somme
[Image: Austrian soldier at the wooden trenches during WWI, Eastern Europe, 1915, via deathandmysticism]

invisiblestories:

"The recruits of 1914 have the look of ghosts. They are queuing up to be slaughtered: they are already dead." - Geoff Dyer, The Missing of the Somme

[Image: Austrian soldier at the wooden trenches during WWI, Eastern Europe, 1915, via deathandmysticism]

(via thomortiz)

epruitt:

Artist Giuseppe Licari

Entitled: Humus, Secret Gardens (2012),Tent Rotterdam. A site-specific installation. 

Materials: Ceiling construction, trees’ roots, halogen lamps.

Sicilian Artist Giuseppe Licari, b. 1980, based in Rotterdam, Netherlands, focuses on the cross-border of the natural world and the built environment.

His site-specific installation, titled Humus ( referring to the soil layer that is essential for the growth of trees and plants), and taking place at TENT Rotterdam’s central space, features the extended roots of trees affixed to the top of the ceiling like exposed organic chandeliers, transforming the room into a sort of underground lair (technically ‘layer’).

Through viewer interaction with the installation itself, the relationship between humankind and nature, growth and decay are central themes in Licari’s work, which resonates with an echo of Arte Povera(where we seekto go back to our roots—an era that predates digital reliance).

Licari says, ”I focus on the space surrounding us and I often use a whiff of universal irony, trying to convey a message in a way that it is easily accessible. I do this partly because I intend to give to the audience an active role in my work.” 

His composed landscapes (an open-ended process of exploration of human perception) constitute places of memories, where emotions of the individual become ‘part’ of a collective experience. To Licari, forming a collective memory between all participants, creates different levels of reactions and contribute to the artwork itself- the work then becomes complete. 

Sources: Giuseppe Licari | Visual News | ARCH20 | Feather of Me | My Modern Met

settingconsidered:

Mine Pavilion by Pezo Von Ellrichshausen

Its simple form combines several building types rendering it a billboard to drivers but a tunnel to pedestrians.

(Source: pezo.cl, via carex)